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The Sharing Economy is Upon Us

Sharing models are built on equality and cooperation. People simply come together in community sharing resources that provide for all. These models apply to societies and in relationship to the planet as we cooperate with her needs.

The Cooperative Model

cooperative (also known as co-operativeco-op, or coop) is “an autonomous association of persons united voluntarily to meet their common economic, social, and cultural needs and aspirations through a jointly-owned enterprise“.[1] Cooperatives are democratically owned by their members, with each member having one vote in electing the board of directors. Cooperatives may include:

  • businesses owned and managed by the people who use their services (a consumer cooperative)
  • organizations managed by the people who work there (worker cooperatives)
  • multi-stakeholder or hybrid cooperatives that share ownership between different stakeholder groups. For example, care cooperatives where ownership is shared between both care-givers and receivers. Stakeholders might also include non-profits or investors.
  • second- and third-tier cooperatives whose members are other cooperatives
  • platform cooperatives that use a cooperatively owned and governed website, mobile app or a protocol to facilitate the sale of goods and services. (Wikipedia.org)

Many cooperatives follow the seven Rochdale Principles:[22]

  1. Voluntary and open membership
  2. Democratic member control, with each member having one vote.
  3. Economic participation by members
  4. Autonomy and independence
  5. Education, training and information
  6. Cooperation among cooperatives
  7. Concern for community

An Introduction to Doughnut Economics

The environmental ceiling consists of nine planetary boundaries, as set out by Rockstrom et al, beyond which lie unacceptable environmental degradation and potential tipping points in Earth systems. The twelve dimensions of the social foundation are derived from internationally agreed minimum social standards, as identified by the world’s governments in the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015. Between social and planetary boundaries lies an environmentally safe and socially just space in which humanity can thrive.

More from Kate Raworth at https://www.kateraworth.com/doughnut/


1/29//21

The Following is taken from this article:

https://timebanks.org/timebankingabout/

The Five Core Values of TimeBanking

In his  book No More Throw-Away People, Edgar Cahn listed four values that stand at the heart of successful timebanking and have stood the test of time.  Later, he added a fifth. 

Asset
 Every one of us has something of value to share with someone else.

Redefining Work There are some forms of work that money will not easily pay for, like building strong families, revitalizing neighborhoods, making democracy work, advancing social justice. Time credits were designed to reward, recognize and honor that work.

Reciprocity  The question: “How can I help you?” needs to change so we ask: “Will you help someone too?”  Paying it forward ensures that, together, we help each other build the world we all will live in.

Community/Social Networks Helping each other, we reweave communities of support, strength & trust. Community is built by sinking roots, building trust, creating networks. 

Respect  The heart and soul of democracy lies in respect for others. We strive to respect where people are in the moment, not where we hope they will be at some future point.


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